Pentagon official says Russian troops have ‘deliberately punched holes’ in their own gas tanks ‘presumably’ to avoid combat as morale declines: report

A man on crutches walks past the remains of a Russian military vehicles.

A person on crutches walks previous the stays of a Russian army autos in Bucha, near the capital Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 1, 2022.Serhii Nuzhnenko/AP

  • Some Russian troops are deliberately punching holes of their gasoline tanks, a Pentagon official stated, per The New York Instances.

  • The official stated that most of the Russian troops are younger and inexperienced, per the Instances.

  • Some Russian troops are surrendering to Ukrainian forces as morale drops, Insider beforehand reported.

Some Russian troops have “intentionally punched holes of their autos’ gasoline tanks” as morale among the many Russians declines, a senior US official stated.

The troops seem like self-sabotaging to be able to keep away from fight, the unnamed senior Pentagon official stated, per The New York Instances. The official added that most of the Russian troops are younger and inexperienced in fight, and they’re dealing with dwindling meals and gas assets.

Tuesday marks day six of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, prompting protests the world over, together with in Russia. Explosions have rocked the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv, in addition to Ukraine’s second-biggest metropolis, Kharkiv, since Russia invaded the area.

As morale drops, a number of the Russian troops have surrendered to Ukrainian forces “with no struggle,” a US senior protection official informed reporters in a briefing on Tuesday.

The US official stated that there was proof “of a sure threat averse conduct by the Russian army,” since Russia launched its assault on Ukraine, CNN reported.

In response to Russia’s assault, western nations have since levied heavy sanctions and different restrictive monetary measures in opposition to the nation, a transfer that Putin claimed was illegal.

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Anglers need to report, release tagged northern pike caught in Utah Lake — and kill the rest

Provo — As a part of an ongoing research launched two years in the past, the Utah Division of Wildlife Sources continues to be asking anglers to report and launch any tagged northern pike they catch in Utah Lake. And, as a result of the invasive fish had been positioned in Utah Lake illegally, anglers should kill any northern pike they catch that do not have a tag.

Northern pike, with its jaw open, lying on an ice-covered lake

DWR biologists began tagging among the northern pike in Utah Lake and its tributaries in February 2020 as a part of a research to be taught extra in regards to the seasonal areas and actions of juvenile and grownup pike in Utah Lake, the Provo River, Hobble Creek and the Spanish Fork River. The research is anticipated to run for at the very least 5 years (till 2025).

Since northern pike sometimes spawn when the ice begins to soften, anglers could catch extra of the invasive fish at Utah Lake this time of yr.

The tagged northern pike have skinny, purple items of plastic hooked up to them. Tagged fish have been implanted with transmitters so biologists can observe them utilizing GPS expertise. Surgical scars must be seen on their underside within the unlikely occasion that the exterior tag is dislodged.

“We’re asking anglers to launch pike which have these tags as a result of the transmitters which can be within the fish allow us to trace their actions,” DWR Central Area Native Aquatics Biologist Keith Lawrence mentioned. “Monitoring their actions will assist us develop a monitoring and management program for northern pike sooner or later, which is able to assist threatened June suckers.”

Should you catch a tagged northern pike in Utah Lake or one in every of its tributaries, you must do the next:


  • Name DWR native fish biologist Dale Fonken at 503-730-9424

  • Report the date and precise location the place you caught the fish

  • Report the tag quantity

  • Launch the fish unhurt

As previously, when you catch a pike that does not have a tag, you could take away the fish from the water and kill it.

“In that case, we all the time like to listen to exactly the place and when these fish had been caught. The scale of the fish is all the time good info as nicely,” Lawrence mentioned. “If a tagged pike inadvertently dies, we’d nonetheless prefer to recuperate the fish in case the transmitter could be reused, so we ask of us to tell us if that occurs. We would like to have the fish or tag dropped at our workplace in Springville, however we are going to gladly make preparations to select it up from the angler.”

Northern pike had been first detected by the DWR in Utah Lake in 2011. As a result of pike are predatory and reproduce quickly, biologists are frightened in regards to the impact they are going to have on among the different fish species within the lake. June suckers are of explicit concern resulting from their precarious standing, however pike have the potential to impression sportfish within the lake akin to walleye, white bass and yellow perch.

June suckers, that are discovered solely in Utah Lake, had been downlisted from endangered to threatened in December 2020, an enormous accomplishment and main milestone of their restoration. Their continued restoration and eventual delisting from the Endangered Species Act might be jeopardized if the variety of pike within the lake expands to unrestricted ranges.

Utah School District Ignored Racial Harassment for Years, Report Says

In October 2019, a white elementary college pupil dressed up as Hitler for Halloween, giving the Nazi salute as he marched in a parade by means of the hallways, the division stated. Employees members didn’t cease him or report him to the varsity’s directors, the report stated.

Typically, white college students would demand that their Black friends give them permission to make use of racial slurs directed at Black individuals. When Black college students resisted, they had been “typically threatened or bodily assaulted,” the division stated.

The harassment would typically occur in entrance of members of the district’s predominantly white college and employees, however they “wouldn’t reply or intervene in any means,” the division stated.

Typically, Black and Asian American college students had been informed “to not be so delicate,” the division stated. Concluding that faculty workers successfully condoned the habits, some college students stopped reporting harassment and started lacking college due to it, based on the report.

Some former college students stated that racism had continued within the district for many years.

Jacob Low, 32, and his youthful brother, Randy Low, 27, who attended faculties within the district within the early 2000s, stated in separate interviews on Sunday that college students and academics had repeatedly harassed them for being half Japanese.

In highschool, Jacob Low stated, an English trainer taunted him in entrance of different college students about his Japanese heritage. Their mom referred to as directors quite a few occasions, he stated, and informed them, “You guys have a severe racism drawback.”

However directors and academics both didn’t appear to know find out how to curb the harassment or didn’t care sufficient to attempt to deal with it, Randy Low stated.

Covid Hit U.S. Meat Plants Far Harder Than Thought, Report Says

Staff at meatpacking vegetation are thought-about important employees in the US, so when others stayed dwelling early within the pandemic, they saved working, typically standing elbow to elbow in processing strains with little room for social distancing. And meatpacking employees are recognized to have been among the many hardest hit by the coronavirus of any occupation.

However lawmakers now say the influence was far worse than beforehand believed, with triple the variety of infections and deaths at 5 of the nation’s largest meatpacking conglomerates, the place some main services grew to become main scorching spots early within the pandemic.

A congressional report, primarily based on newly obtained paperwork from the nation’s 5 largest meat processing corporations, discovered that between March 1, 2020, and Feb. 1, 2021, roughly 59,000 employees contracted the coronavirus, practically thrice the 22,700 infections estimated over an extended interval, between April 2020 and September 2021, by the Meals and Atmosphere Reporting Community, a nonprofit information group whose knowledge on the trade has been broadly cited.

The Home Choose Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Disaster, which printed the report on Wednesday, stated that 269 deaths had been recorded amongst plant employees in that point, triple the reporting community’s earlier estimates.

The group primarily based its knowledge on publicly obtainable info from the 5 corporations that management greater than 80 % of the U.S. marketplace for beef and greater than 60 % of the marketplace for pork: JBS USA, Tyson Meals, Smithfield Meals, Cargill, and Nationwide Beef.

The lawmakers stated the businesses may have taken extra steps to maintain coronavirus infections and deaths at bay of their vegetation.

“As an alternative of addressing the clear indications that employees had been contracting the coronavirus at alarming charges because of situations in meatpacking services, meatpacking corporations prioritized earnings and manufacturing over employee security, persevering with to make use of practices that led to crowded services through which the virus unfold simply,” the report stated.

The committee recognized vegetation the place the virus unfold probably the most within the pandemic’s first 12 months, together with a JBS plant in Hyrum, Utah, the place 54 % of staff contracted Covid-19. Half the employees at Tyson’s plant in Amarillo, Texas, contracted Covid-19, the report stated, as did 44 % of employees on the Nationwide Beef facility in Tama, Iowa.

The trade operates largely in rural areas, and relies upon disproportionately on Black and Latino immigrants to do the low-wage work of slicing, deboning and packing the rooster, beef and pork that reaches American dinner tables.

Meat processors confronted criticism final 12 months for an absence of employee protections. Many employees died because the virus swept via processing vegetation, a few of which had been compelled to shut briefly. Staff staged walkouts over issues that they weren’t being correctly protected.

Some vegetation put in dividers between work stations and slowed their manufacturing strains with a view to widen the house between employees. A number of corporations additionally provided monetary incentives to maintain employees on the job.

Tyson stated it had spent greater than $700 million on Covid security measures and on introducing on-site medical companies to its vegetation. The corporate introduced this week that 96 % of its employees had been vaccinated.